Overdose Asian Male Drug Addict With Problems, Man In Hood WithKetamine is a drug both used commonly for medical purposes and for recreational purposes.
 
It’s on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines for its use as a sedative and powerful painkiller, and to begin and maintain anesthesia. It tends to produce a trance-like state that can, in high doses, include euphoria and memory loss.

Due to the trance often experienced by people on ketamine, it’s classified as a dissociative drug. These are a type of hallucinogens that produce a unique state in which the user may feel as though the world or the self is unreal, or lose a sense of connection to the self. It may also cause hallucinations and a feeling of sensory deprivation as the drug blocks certain connections in the brain.

Because of this experience, many people have tried ketamine for recreational reasons, and some of these go on to abuse and possibly become addicted to the drug. Some of these individuals will end up taking too much.

Dangerous Side Effects

Many accidental overdoses occur when a person attempts to reach the “K-hole.” People who abuse ketamine compare this experience to an out-of-body or near-death experience because they reach a high level of sedation without falling asleep. However, this effect begins once a person ingests more than 2 mg per kilogram of body weight, which also puts them at a much higher risk of overdose, breathing problems, coma, and death.

Physical effects from taking ketamine, even at a small dose, can include loss of coordination, stumbling, and muscle weakness for 24 hours after the dose. This means that driving, operating heavy machinery, and even walking up and down stairs can potentially lead to injury.

Other dangerous side effects include:

  • Tachycardia, or increased heart rate that hits dangerous levels
  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle rigidity
  • Respiratory trouble
  • Flashbacks to hallucinations during trip
  • Depression
  • Paranoia
  • Long-term cognitive difficulties
  • Comedown

    The ketamine comedown – the drug-induced equivalent of a hangover – can be very intense and dangerous. Because ketamine is designed to be a sedative, a person is more likely to come off the drug in a state of intense confusion or delirium. They may be physically weak and helpless. They are more likely to experience numbness and impaired vision as well. Confusion can also cause aggressive behavior, amnesia, and delirium.

    Anecdotal reports of ketamine comedowns suggest that random bursts of paranoia or aggression are common, physical aches and pains should be expected, and insomnia is likely, which enhances mood swings and exhaustion. These hangover symptoms are more likely to occur when a person takes too much ketamine, takes it repeatedly over too many hours, or mixes ketamine with other drugs.

    Sexual Assault and Crime

    Since ketamine is a powerful sedative, with a high potential for amnesia, it is often used as a date rape drug. People who recreationally abuse ketamine put themselves at a higher risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection, suffering physical harm from becoming the target of sexual assault or other violence, or being the victim of other forms of crime, such as theft.

    Drug Interactions

    If a doctor plans to use ketamine on a person during surgery, it is important for the doctor to be aware of other medications the patient is taking. This sedative interacts negatively with many other medications, recreational drugs, and even foods. These include:

  • Opioid painkillers, including morphine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone
  • Tramadol
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines like Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, etc.
  • Ambien, Sonata, and other sleep aids
  • Medications to treat seizure disorders and epilepsy, including Dilantin, Tegretol, and Trileptal
  • Some antibiotics like Rifampin
  • Alcohol and other recreational sedatives
  • Grapefruit juice, which can reduce the drug’s effectiveness
  • When ketamine is abused recreationally, it is primarily used in club or rave settings. This means that it could be combined with amphetamines like Molly, MDMA, ecstasy, and more. Mixing stimulants like amphetamines with depressants like ketamine can induce heart problems and seizures, among other serious problems.

    Mixing ketamine with depressants is also very dangerous. Alcohol is a common depressant consumed at social events like raves, but a person ingesting recreational drugs in these scenarios may also encounter marijuana, heroin and other narcotics, and GHB, all of which are central nervous system depressants. Mixing these drugs with ketamine increases the likelihood of respiratory depression, oxygen deprivation, and death.

    Ketamine Overdose

    treatment optionsIt’s not as easy to overdose on ketamine as some other drugs, but it can and does happen. Part of what makes the drug appealing as an anesthetic is that it doesn’t depress the respiratory system nearly as much as opioids or benzodiazepines like Valium. However, its psychoactive effects have made it popular as a “club drug.” People who take drugs at night clubs, parties, and raves are often more vulnerable to overdose due to the fact that it’s so easy to be pressured into taking multiple drugs or drinking while taking drugs, which can compound the dangerous effects or hide signs of overdose.

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      Even if death is unlikely – there were only 93 cases in the UK from 2005 to 2013 – it’s still a good idea to be aware of the signs of ketamine overdose. These can include:

      • Intense lethargy
      • Nausea or vomiting
      • Diarrhea
      • Intense head or muscle pain
      • Loss of coordination
      • Muscle rigidity
      • Chest pain
      • Psychotic behavior
      • Extreme paranoia
      • Atypical behavior from other ketamine sessions
      • Slowed breathing
      • Unconsciousness

      Most of the time, an overdose involving ketamine will involve a depressant drug like alcohol. It’s therefore also helpful to look out for signs of insufficient oxygen, such as bluish lips or fingernails, gray or ashen skin, or a gurgling sound coming from the throat.

    Other Health Effects

    Ketamine is an addictive drug. With addiction comes the potential to suffer from the long-term effects of a drug. Ketamine has been known to cause long-term changes in a person’s mental health or even overall personality. There have been cases of depressed individuals seeking out ketamine as a form of escape from reality, only to become increasingly depressed on the drug, eventually leading to suicide. However, scientific studies are somewhat lacking on the subject, so it can be hard to say how much of a role the drug played in these cases.

    One particular long-term health effect associated with this substance is ketamine bladder syndrome. Ketamine is particularly hard on the bladder and kidneys due to the fact that its metabolites act as toxins in the urinary tract and breed bacteria in this system, plus they attack the muscles of the bladder on a cellular level. This can lead to bladder and kidney damage – problems that can cause serious health problems and endanger a person’s life. This makes it very important that treatment be sought as soon as possible for addiction to ketamine.

    Ketamine is a potent drug that can be abused, but it also has an important medical use. It is a Schedule III drug, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), because ketamine’s dissociative powers make it an important drug used in surgery. In fact, the drug was initially developed in 1962 as a general anesthetic with rapid onset. Currently, with better anesthetics available for most patients, ketamine is primarily used in veterinary medicine, on some children, or some elderly patients. When used recreationally, this potent drug can also be addictive, and many people abuse it for the sensory changes and hallucinations it brings, much like PCP.

    Dangerous Side Effects

    Many accidental overdoses occur when a person attempts to reach the “K-hole.” People who abuse ketamine compare this experience to an out-of-body or near-death experience because they reach a high level of sedation without falling asleep. However, this effect begins once a person ingests more than 2 mg per kilogram of body weight, which also puts them at a much higher risk of overdose, breathing problems, coma, and death.

    Physical effects from taking ketamine, even at a small dose, can include loss of coordination, stumbling, and muscle weakness for 24 hours after the dose. This means that driving, operating heavy machinery, and even walking up and down stairs can potentially lead to injury.

    Other dangerous side effects include:

  • Tachycardia, or increased heart rate that hits dangerous levels
  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle rigidity
  • Respiratory trouble
  • Flashbacks to hallucinations during trip
  • Depression
  • Paranoia
  • Long-term cognitive difficulties
  • Comedown

    The ketamine comedown – the drug-induced equivalent of a hangover – can be very intense and dangerous. Because ketamine is designed to be a sedative, a person is more likely to come off the drug in a state of intense confusion or delirium. They may be physically weak and helpless. They are more likely to experience numbness and impaired vision as well. Confusion can also cause aggressive behavior, amnesia, and delirium.

    Anecdotal reports of ketamine comedowns suggest that random bursts of paranoia or aggression are common, physical aches and pains should be expected, and insomnia is likely, which enhances mood swings and exhaustion. These hangover symptoms are more likely to occur when a person takes too much ketamine, takes it repeatedly over too many hours, or mixes ketamine with other drugs.

    Sexual Assault and Crime

    Since ketamine is a powerful sedative, with a high potential for amnesia, it is often used as a date rape drug. People who recreationally abuse ketamine put themselves at a higher risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection, suffering physical harm from becoming the target of sexual assault or other violence, or being the victim of other forms of crime, such as theft.

    Drug Interactions

    If a doctor plans to use ketamine on a person during surgery, it is important for the doctor to be aware of other medications the patient is taking. This sedative interacts negatively with many other medications, recreational drugs, and even foods. These include:

  • Opioid painkillers, including morphine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone
  • Tramadol
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines like Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, etc.
  • Ambien, Sonata, and other sleep aids
  • Medications to treat seizure disorders and epilepsy, including Dilantin, Tegretol, and Trileptal
  • Some antibiotics like Rifampin
  • Alcohol and other recreational sedatives
  • Grapefruit juice, which can reduce the drug’s effectiveness
  • When ketamine is abused recreationally, it is primarily used in club or rave settings. This means that it could be combined with amphetamines like Molly, MDMA, ecstasy, and more. Mixing stimulants like amphetamines with depressants like ketamine can induce heart problems and seizures, among other serious problems.

    Mixing ketamine with depressants is also very dangerous. Alcohol is a common depressant consumed at social events like raves, but a person ingesting recreational drugs in these scenarios may also encounter marijuana, heroin and other narcotics, and GHB, all of which are central nervous system depressants. Mixing these drugs with ketamine increases the likelihood of respiratory depression, oxygen deprivation, and death.