Finding Treatment Options in Henderson, Nevada

While Nevada may be more widely recognized for its gambling epicenters – Reno and Las Vegas –the city of Henderson houses 277,440 and the local population continues to rise.[1] With any large population in the United States comes a melting pot of people. Individuals from all walks of life, socioeconomic backgrounds, and races combine in Henderson and make for an interesting substance abuse profile.

Drug Addiction

Past-month illicit drug abuse rates are higher in Nevada at 9.35 percent than the national average of 8.02 percent.[2] Nationally, 24.6 million people identified themselves as current users of illicit drugs in 2013.[3] Certain factors contribute to the likelihood that an individual will engage in substance abuse or end up dependent on drugs or alcohol. Sometimes it’s as obvious as being brought up by parents who engage in the same practices. For example, children of alcoholics are eight times more likely to become dependent on alcohol themselves one day.[4] Peer influence is also a factor.

However, there are other things that influence the likelihood of addiction occurring, and many are out of the individual’s control. For instance, your race can actually predispose you to an increased risk of substance abuse. Among youths specifically, Hispanic young people are more likely to have reported drug and alcohol use than other races.[5] In Henderson, 14.9 percent of the population is comprised of Hispanic individuals.[6]

If you’re living below the poverty level, unemployed, or homeless, both substance abuse and mental illness are more likely to affect you. All of these factors meld together and can create a recipe for substance abuse. Around 4.1 million people aged 18-64 and living below the federal poverty had a disability in 2010.[7] Among individuals who receive public health services for mental illness, 80 percent are unemployed.[8]

During 2013, 8,693 people sought treatment in Nevada for substance use disorders, compared to 2.5 million who sought treatment nationally.[9], [10] Among all drugs responsible for admissions to treatment in the state, stimulants are in the lead, followed by marijuana in second place, and heroin in third place.[11] Next in line are other opiates, mainly prescription opioid pain relievers, which are equally as popular across the United States.[12] Over 6 million Americans suffer from addictions to these drugs and 50 of those people die each day as a result.[13] Amphetamines alone accounted for 2,230 admissions to treatment centers in the state in 2013, and cocaine for 268. Marijuana accounted for 1,580 admissions, and heroin and other opiates accounted for 920 and 535 respectively.[14]

nevada admission rate

Unfortunately, not everyone gets the help they need where addiction is concerned. In fact, just around 11 percent of the 22.7 million nationally who needed such care in 2013 did.[15] The outcome of not getting help can be dire. Many continue to delve deeper into a life of substance abuse, and for some, their lives abruptly end that way, too. The rate of drug-related overdose deaths in Nevada from 2007 to 2008 was significantly higher than the national rate at 20.1 per 100,000 deaths in the state versus 12.7 per 100,000 across America.[16] The state’s rate rose to fourth highest in the country at 21.6 per 100,000 deaths in 2014.[17]

felonies and penalties

Abusing illicit drugs isn’t possible if they aren’t accessible. While there are certain medical avenues available to secure supplies of marijuana and prescription drugs like opioid painkillers and benzodiazepines, harder substances must be transported into Henderson. The majority of Nevada’s drug supply comes from across the border in Mexico.

The penalties for taking part in drug trafficking in the state of Nevada are harsh. All trafficking of any amount of marijuana is classed as a felony and imposes anywhere from one year to life in prison, with fines ranging from $5,000 to $200,000.[18] Trafficking heroin or cocaine can land you behind bars for a quarter century and leave you footing a $500,000 bill.[19], [20]

Selling these drugs also comes at a cost. Even possession of minor amounts of these substances can land an individual in serious trouble. A possession of heroin charge comes with steep penalties of up to 20 years in prison and $20,000 in fines.[21] Cocaine warrants the same.[22] Possession of marijuana may bring up to $5,000 in fines and four years in prison.[23] It is notably one of the mildest illicit drugs in the state. That being said, it’s also one of the most abused. As of 2007, 310 per 100,000 people were arrested for marijuana offenses in the state.[24]

Efforts to deter criminal activity and substance abuse in the state are in place. Prescription drug take-back programs, prescription monitoring, and stiff penalties for breaking drug-related laws all work toward a combined goal of reducing negative outcomes associates with drug and alcohol abuse.

Alcoholism

Alcohol abuse is not a new concept, and most certainly not in a city that borders a party town like Las Vegas. Nationwide, alcoholism affects 17 million people annually.[25] In Nevada, 2,932 of the 8,693 people who were admitted for treatment in 2013 cited alcohol as either the sole substance of abuse or one of two or more they were abusing.[26] Between 2010 and 2012, 21 people died in Nevada as a result of alcohol poisoning each year on average, compared to 2,221 nationwide.[27] In Nevada, 19,147 people died between 2006 and 2010, and 943 of those deaths were linked to alcohol.[28]

In 2013, 8,841 Nevadans were arrested for drinking and driving.[29] Individuals could end up taking someone else’s life when they drink and drive. During 2013, 10,076 people died as a result of alcohol-impaired vehicle accidents, and 79 of those deaths occurred in Nevada.[30] Per 100,000 people in Nevada, the rate of alcohol-related driving fatalities is 2.8 compared to 3.2 nationwide.[31]

alcoholism in arizona

Nevadans may be less likely to learn their lesson the first time around when it comes to drunk driving. Among all drivers contributing to alcohol-related driving fatalities with a blood alcohol content level between 0.08 and 0.14, 33.3 percent are repeat offenders in Nevada, compared to 27 percent nationally.[32] While a first offense may only impose 48 hours in jail, the person is looking at as much as six months in jail for second offenses and six years in jail for third offenses, in addition to fines ranging from $400 to $5,000, a suspended license, and the possibility of having a breathalyzer installed in the car.[33]

Prescription drop-off boxes are found in at least five locations in Henderson that allow individuals to dispose of excess medications they no longer need.[34] All disposed drugs are collected on a regular basis and incinerated. Combined totals from two National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day events mounted to a collection of 309 tons of prescription pills across the nation in 2010.[35] There is hope that local efforts to deter substance abuse will produce similar results on a smaller scale in Henderson.

Mental Health

co-occurring disorders

Nationwide, 42.5 million people suffer from a mental health disorder every year.[36] In Nevada, around 117,000 people are affected by mental illness.[37] Without treatment, many suffer serious side effects, and substance abuse is one of them. Around 29 percent of all people with mental health disorders are also abusing drugs or alcohol.[38]

Aside from self-medicating with drugs and alcohol, many people who live with mental health disorders take their own lives in effort to escape the uncomfortable symptoms that plague them. Nevada outranks most of the nation, holding the number two spot for suicide rates in the country at 19.2 per 100,000 people in 2006 – a great deal higher than the nation’s rate that year of 10.9 per 100,000.[39] Criminal activity also occurs more often in the mentally ill population.

Drug Treatment Centers

nevada facilities breakdownThere were 82 substance abuse treatment centers in Nevada and 25 of them also rehabilitate individuals with mental health issues.[40] Two of the state’s treatment centers are located in Henderson.[41] Private nonprofit facilities accounted for 58.5 percent of all in the state that year while 29.3 percent were private for-profit organizations. About 2.4 percent were run by state agencies, 4.9 percent by federal agencies, and another 4.9 percent by tribal governments.[42] In Henderson specifically, outpatient treatment services are available to meet the needs of individuals local to the area. If you’re feeling like you can’t easily readjust to life after treatment and need additional help, the area boasts four sober living homes to help you get back on your feet.[43]

Paying for treatment can be tricky for many people with substance abuse and mental health disorders. As a result, they’re often less likely to have steady income and health insurance. A reported 37.3 percent of Americans who needed substance abuse treatment from 2010 to 2013 and didn’t get it cited a lack of means to pay for it as the reason for their choice.[44] Fortunately, the city of Henderson is home to facilities that understand this plight and want to help people seek treatment anyway. Payment plans that are broken up into increments over the treatment period and sliding scale options that take your income into account when totaling treatment charges are both available in the city.

If you’re researching treatment facilities and wondering what differentiates them, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Licensure and accreditation
  • Staffing
  • Treatment for co-occurring disorders
  • Treatment modalities available

Not every individual who seeks substance abuse treatment will benefit from the same type of care. Sometimes facilities boast accreditations on their websites. In addition, licensure is one of the most important components of any treatment facility or professional. You cannot be licensed in the state of Nevada to treat substance abuse clients without first verifying you are 21 years of age or older and a citizen of the United States.[45] In addition, a master’s degree is required for this level of work, along with 2,000 hours of supervised work in the counseling field. Counselors also need to complete oral and written exams and pay several fees to obtain licensure in Nevada.

For more information on treatment for mental health disorders and substance abuse in the state of Nevada, reach out to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, Southern Nevada Chapter or Substance Free Nevada.

Citations

[1]State and Country QuickFacts.” (2014). United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[2]Nevada Drug Control Update.” (n.d.). White House. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[3]Substance Use and Mental Health Estimates from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Overview of Findings.” (2014 Sep 4). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[4]Children of Alcoholics.” (n.d.). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[5] Nauert, R. (n.d.). “High Risk of Substance Abuse among Hispanic Youth.Psych Central. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[6]State and County QuickFacts.” (2014). United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[7] Carney, J. (2012 Mar 7). “Poverty & Mental Illness: You Can’t Have One Without the Other.Mad in America. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[8]Mental Illness: NAMI Report Deplores 80 Percent Unemployment Rate; State Rates and Ranks Listed — Model Legislation Proposed.” (2014 Jan 1). National Alliance on Mental Illness. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[9]Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions by Primary Substance of Abuse.” (2013). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[10]Substance Use and Mental Health Estimates from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Overview of Findings.” (2014 Sep 4). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[11]Nevada Drug Control Update.” (n.d.). White House. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[12] Ibid.

[13]Reports.”(n.d.). Healthy Americans. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[14]Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions by Primary Substance of Abuse.” (2013). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[15]Substance Use and Mental Health Estimates from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Overview of Findings.” (2014 Sep 4). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[16]Nevada Drug Control Update.” (n.d.). White House. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[17] Castro, K. (2015 Aug 3). “Report: Nevada fourth highest for drug overdose deaths.Las Vegas Now. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[18]Nevada Laws & Penalties.” (n.d.). NORML. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[19]Nevada Heroin Laws.” (n.d.). FindLaw. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[20]Nevada Cocaine Laws.” (n.d.). FindLaw. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[21]Nevada Heroin Laws.” (n.d.). FindLaw. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[22]Nevada Cocaine Laws.” (n.d.). FindLaw. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[23]Nevada Laws & Penalties.” (n.d.). NORML. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[24] Gettman, J. (2009 Nov 5). “Marijuana in Nevada.Drug Science. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[25]Alcohol Use Disorder.” (n.d.). National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[26]Substance Use and Mental Health Estimates from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Overview of Findings.” (2014 Sep 4). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[27] Kanny, D., Brewer, R.D., Mesnick, J.B., Paulozzi, L.Z., Naimi, T.S. & Hau, L. (2015 Jan 6). “Vital Signs: Alcohol Poisoning Deaths — United States, 2010-2012.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[28]Alcohol-related deaths: How does your state rank?.” (2014 Jun 27). CBS News. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[29]State Map.” (n.d.). Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Ibid.

[32] Ibid.

[33]Nevada Drunk Driving Fines & Penalties.” (n.d.). NOLO. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[34] Valley, J. (2011 Oct 19). “Police install prescription drug drop-off boxes in Henderson.Las Vegas Sun. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[35] Ibid.

[36]State Estimates of Adult Mental Illness from the 2011 and 2012 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health.” (2014 Sep 4). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[37]State Statistics: Nevada.” (2010). National Alliance on Mental Illness. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[38]Substance Abuse and Mental Health.” (n.d.). Helpguide. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[39] Ryan, C. (2010 Aug 21). “Study says Nevada ranks No. 2 in nation for suicides.Las Vegas Sun. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[40]2011 State Profile — National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services.” (2011). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[41]Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator.” (n.d.). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[42]2011 State Profile — National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services.” (2011). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[43]Sober Living Directory.” (n.d.). Intervention America. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[44]State Estimates of Adult Mental Illness from the 2011 and 2012 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health.” (2014 Sep 4). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed September 18, 2015.

[45]Licensed Clinical Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselor.” (n.d.). Nevada State Board of Examiners. Accessed September 18, 2015.